Ohio coronavirus

A look at the past two coronavirus maps in Ohio.

Record numbers are continuing with coronavirus cases in Ohio, Gov. Mike DeWine said Thursday.

"Today’s daily numbers continue our growing trend topping 7,000 cases reported since yesterday,” he said in his televised briefing and on Twitter. “Another one-day record. We also have our second highest day of hospital admissions with 268 people getting admitted to the hospital.”

“Every county in Ohio exceeds the CDC’s threshold for high incidence,” DeWine continued. “...Even the lowest county is almost (twice) the high incidence level.”
A week earlier, Ohio’s case count stood at 4,961.
“I often hear people say that the increase in cases is because we are doing more testing,” DeWine said Thursday. “As you can see from this chart, our testing has increased but our cases have spiked dramatically— almost four times the amount of our testing increase.”
Ohio is at its highest level of COVID-19 hospitalizations and in ICU coronavirus patients since the pandemic began, he reported.
For the week, Richland County remained in the red, which represents very high exposure and spread of COVID-19.
“Richland County residents are encouraged to limit activities as much as possible and to follow all current health orders,” Richland Public Health said in a separate news release Thursday.
In his briefing, DeWine said that 68 of Ohio’s 88 counties are now red.
“The entire state is filling in with red,” DeWine said of the weekly color-coded maps.

The latest update from the Shelby City Health Department on Nov. 5 showed 101 total cases in Shelby since the pandemic started in March. In all, 86 people have recovered. That Nov. 5 report showed 14 active cases. Since the pandemic’s start in March, one death is reported in Shelby dating back to Sept. 29.
DeWine’s comments came one day after he delivered a statewide televised speech in which he announced a strengthened mask order and social-distancing orders.
As announced by DeWine and detailed by his office in a news release: 
* Each store will be required to post a sign outlining face-covering requirements at all public entrances to the store;
 * Each store will be responsible for ensuring that customers and employees are wearing masks; and
* A new Retail Compliance Unit, comprised of agents led by the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation, will inspect to ensure compliance. A first violation will result in a written warning and a second violation will result in closure of the store for up to 24 hours.
Under Ohio’s new social gathering order, according to the governor’s office:
* Ohio’s April order that limits public events and private gatherings of more than 10 people is still in effect, “however, there has been rampant spread of the virus as a result of banquets, wedding receptions, and social gatherings following funerals.”
* To address the tragedies that have resulted from such events, the Ohio Department of Health will issue an order that will place significant new restrictions on these social activities, DeWine’s office detailed. 
“Specifically, open congregate areas will no longer be permitted to open, and everyone will be required to be seated and masked unless they are actively consuming food or drinks,” the governor said.
* Bars, restaurants and fitness centers may remain open, but this is to be reassessed on Nov. 19, according to the announcement.
On Thursday, DeWine said he had received a lot of feedback about his statement involving bars and restaurants and that no decision had been made.
“We are going to be guided by what the hospitals are telling us,” he said.
“What’s unique about bars and restaurants, as well as fitness centers, is that for a great deal of time people are not wearing a mask,” DeWine also said.
On Thursday, DeWine said he had received a lot of feedback about his statement involving bars and restaurants and that no decision had been made.
“We are going to be guided by what the hospitals are telling us,” he said also stating that “a totality of all the circumstances” would be considered in the matter.
“What’s unique about bars and restaurants, as well as fitness centers, is that for a great deal of time people are not wearing a mask,” DeWine also said.
DeWine said that he understands those who do not like the decisions announced Wednesday night.
“I don’t want to close anything, but the buck does stop with me,” he said Thursday. “...At the (case) rate we’re going, this is not sustainable. We’re going to have very bad consequences...”
“It would be totally irresponsible at this point not to take action,” DeWine added.
He was asked about a potential state shutdown.
“We don’t want another shutdown,” DeWine said. “We can all avoid a shutdown if we are very careful. This is within our control. We don’t have to let it get that bad. We don’t have to let it get to the point where hospitals are full. We all have it in our power to prevent this.”
On Thursday, he also announced that the state is setting aside $30 million to assist the state’s 113 local health departments.
“Each department will receive $200,000, and they will have the flexibility to determine how to best use the funds as they see fit to fight COVID-19,” DeWine said.
Remaining money will be used to hire contact tracers to support local health departments, he said.
“Those tracers would be able to deploy wherever they are needed across the state to assist in identifying individuals who may have been exposed to COVID-19 and prevent further spread,” DeWine added.
Also on Thursday, DeWine announced that Ohioans can now view data from their local communities on a map and filter by probable or confirmed case status, county, a specific ZIP code or a time period. It is available at http://coronavirus.ohio.gov
New red counties on Thursday were identified as Brown, Delaware, Erie, Hancock, Jackson, Knox, Miami, Paulding, Seneca, Shelby, Williams and Wood.
“Eight of these counties are red for the first time,” DeWine said.

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